Obituaries

Among deceased past members of the Renal Association are the leading nephrologists of their eras, as well as other ‘unsung heroes’ who played key roles in establishing nephrology in their own regions and institutions.

We honour them here and provide as much information as we can about their roles and achievements. As well as deceased past RA members we also include others from the UK and abroad, who were never RA members, but who made distinguished contributions to the development of nephrology in the UK. This resource is curated by John Feehally (RA Archivist), Joyce Popoola (RA Deputy-Archivist), Stewart Cameron, and Chris Winearls. Where a full obituary is not available, we provide a brief note outlining the individual’s key contributions.

If there is anyone on this list with no obituary posted, and you would be interested to write a piece; or if you have photographs or missing information which you would like to be posted; or if you think there are others whose names should be included here, please contact John Feehally

 

Physiologist. Before the 2nd World War she published with biochemist Philip Eggleton on metabolism and physiology, and then on crush injury during the 2nd World War. In the 1950s she worked on alcohol and the kidney, presenting to the RA in...

Adolph Mark Joekes was known to all his professional colleagues and friends as ‘Jo’.

Born in Leiden, Netherlands, both his parents were doctors, and he came...

Adam Linton qualified from the University of Edinburgh in 1955 and then did postgraduate training in medicine and nephrology in Glasgow, where, as a newly appointed consultant nephrologist, he was responsible for establishing the dialysis unit at...

Sir Adolf William ‘Bill’ Asscher was a physician whose imagination and forward-thinking did much to establish renal medicine as a specialty through his influence as a clinical investigator, as a practitioner of humane medical science, as a mentor...

Alasdair Iain Macdougall was a consultant physician and nephrologist at Stobhill Hospital, Glasgow. Born in Lanarkshire and brought up in Glasgow he was awarded a bursary for Glasgow University, where he gained an intercalated BSc (with first-...

The early death of Tony Raine has deprived British nephrology of one of the outstanding intellects of his generation. His main contribution lay in focusing...

Tony Ralston was an eminent and respected physician and nephrologist at Withington Hospital, Manchester who made considerable contributions to medical education and renal services in the northwest of England
He was born in Ilkeston in...

Antony John Wing was a consultant nephrologist at St Thomas’ and then St George’s hospitals, London. He was born in Oxford, the son of Henry John Taylor Wing, a...

A.A. Osman, formerly physician in charge of the renal unit at Pembury Hospital, and the first president of the Renal Association, died at his home at Crowborough, Sussex...

Arthur Colville Kennedy, one of the pioneers of renal medicine and in particular the treatment of acute renal failure, died on 30th December 2009...

Barry Hoffbrand was born in Bradford to Philip and...

Belding H. Scribner, or “Scrib” to his many friends across the world, died after a fall from his houseboat in Seattle on June 19, 2003. With his passing, nephrology...

Brian Robinson was a consultant physician with a special interest in renal disease at East Birmingham Hospital (which later became Birmingham Heartlands Hospital)....

Brian James Ross Junor was a consultant nephrologist in the Renal and Transplant Unit at Glasgow’s Western Infirmary. After house jobs in Dundee he moved to train in nephrology in Aberdeen, where he completed his MD thesis on the use of...

 

Catherine Louise Chapman (née Chambers) was a Specialist Registrar in Nephrology at Portsmouth Hospitals when she died from metastatic breast cancer on...

John Hodson – known to all as ‘Hoddie’ – was one of the outstanding original thinkers in British diagnostic radiology. He will be remembered by those who trained under him as a fine clinical radiologist, and as a stimulating and exciting teacher...

Charles Dent was born in Burgos, Spain. He was the son of Franklin Dent, who studied chemistry in Leeds before acquiring his PhD in Munich and later working in Spain, where he met his wife. Charles’ mother was Carmen Colsa De Mira y Perceval who...

Charles George, physician, nephrologist and medical historian, was born on 26 November 1940...

Christopher Martin Lockwood was a reader at Cambridge University, a consultant physician at Addenbrooke’s Hospital, and one of the leading innovators in the emerging field of therapeutic immunology. He was born in Halifax, the son of Eric...

Daniel Turnberg was born in Manchester and educated at North Cheshire Jewish School and at Cheadle Hulme School. At Leeds Medical School he took an intercalated BSc in psychology.

After qualifying in 1994 he did his house jobs in Bradford...

David Evans was a consultant physician at Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge. He was brought up in the Welsh speaking village of New Quay and he retained a strong and continued affection for both the village and the language at which he was fluent...

Sir David Innes Williams (generally known as “DI”) had two careers of equal distinction and near equal length – as a surgeon and as an academic administrator...

David was born in 1959 and grew up in Surrey. He attended Woking County Grammar School and later read Biochemistry as an undergraduate at the University of Bristol. He began his training in clinical biochemistry as a student on the MSc course at...

David Nichol Sharp Kerr was born in Hackney on 27th December 1927.   He was educated at George Watson’s Boys School in Edinburgh, and studied medicine at the University...

Nash gave the first ever paper to the RA in 1950, entitled:. ‘Form & function in the renal tract: a review & prospect’.

He was a urologist and worked at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, Sydenham Children’s Hospital and St Thomas’...

Des Oliver came to England in 1960 for a little postgraduate experience and to get the membership. Little did he know that he was to become a leader of the cadre of young...

Ralph Counahan was a colleague and contemporary, a friend always and a foe occasionally, an academic who chose a career in clinical paediatrics and a cosmopolitan man who settled in rural Ireland. Ralph was always a committed paediatrician,...

Douglas Andrew Kilgour Black was President of the College and a former chairman of the British Medical Association. A son of the manse, it was his mother from whom he derived an association with medicine; she had been a ward sister at the Dundee...

Professor Douglas B. Brewer, an important figure in the development of understanding of the kidney and one of the pioneers of renal biopsy pathology, died on 20 December 2016 aged 97.

...

Martin Andrew Mansell, who has died aged 71, was an esteemed consultant nephrologist and one of the premier expert witnesses in the field of nephrology, who did much to develop and contribute to the field of medico-legal opinion in the UK.

...

Michael Darmady trained in pathology after his house appointments and spent most of his career as director of the pathology service of a large National Health...

He was present at the  first RA meeting in 1950.

He was a surgeon at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, London.

He published a paper in Proc RSM in 1948 on sympathectomy and hypertension.

Edwin Nigel Wardle was born on 24 October 1934 in Grimsby. From Wintringham Grammer School, which he left in 1952 with the Cambridge Examination Board Prize, he moved to Gonville and Caius Cambridge. He joined the Caius Medical Association in...

Emma Preston died tragically in a skiing accident on the cusp of being appointed as a consultant nephrologist.

Born in Nicosia, Cyprus she came to the UK as a child with her family and was educated at Queenswood School, Hatfield and...

Pathologist. He began his career in Northern Ireland, then emigrated to Australia (Western Australia, then Monash, Melbourne),  returning to UK in 1967  to work at Children’s Hospital Birmingham where he worked with RHR White. In 1972 he returned...

Eric Bywaters’ life spanned the growth of modern day rheumatology as a separate speciality of medicine. It was his early work as a teacher at the...

Evert Dorhout Mees qualified from the University of Utrecht in 1951, where he became head of the Department of Nephrology & Hypertension in 1976. He was an early pioneer of home hemodialysis which he established in 1967 and founder of the...

 

Faieza was born in Nairobi, Kenya, went to school in Bradford and attended Newnham College, Cambridge from 1980-85, and returned there for a PhD in vasculitis from 1988-1991. She was well-known for her all-inclusive...

Francis Patrick Marsh was a consultant nephrologist at the London Hospital. Born in Birmingham, the family moved to Leeds when he was a child. He was the son of Horatio Septimus Marsh, an office manager, and his wife, Violet. Educated at Leeds...

Frank Byrom was born in Wigan, the son of Thomas Henry Byrom FRIC FCS, chief analytical and research chemist of the Wigan Coal and Iron Companies, and lecturer at the Mining and Technical College. He came of an old Lancashire family which, in the...

Frank John Goodwin was born in Stratford. London, and died at the tragically early age of 49 years after a long and debilitating illness. He was married to Mary Rose Goodwin, ophthalmologist, and was the only son of John Leonard Goodwin, a cost...

A nephrologist at Leeds General Infirmary, and one of the pioneers of dialysis for acute renal failure.

He was never offered FRCP, perhaps because he worked for most of his career in the urology department (under the influential Leslie...

He was a renal physiologist who worked mainly at University College London.

He was RA President 1959-62

He was a physician at Manchester Royal Infirmary, and so worked with Robert Platt, Douglas Black, Bill Stanbury.

He gave a paper to RA in October 1952 on “Structure of the kidney in experimental renal failure”.

He was a urologist who worked at University College Hospital and St Peter’s Hospital, London.

He published mainly in the 1920s and 1930s on the neurological control of micturition.

He was present at the first meeting of the Renal...

Gavin Arneil was a paediatrician in Glasgow and a pioneer in the treatment of children with kidney disease. He established the first specialist children’s kidney unit in the UK and went on to found national, European and International paediatric...

Geoffrey Merton Berlyne was professor of medicine at the State University of New York. He was born in Manchester, the son of Charles Solomon Berlyne, a clothing manufacturer, and Miriam Hannah Berlyne née Rosenthal, the daughter of a watchmaker....

Geoffrey Aber was the first Head and subsequently Dean of Postgraduate Medicine at Keele University, a department he was instrumental in creating; and also a nephrologist responsible for setting up one of the first dialysis units in the UK in the...

George Haycock was the Ferdinand James de Rothschild professor of paediatrics at Guy’s, King’s and St Thomas’ Hospitals School of Medicine, King’s College, University of London, from 1990 until his retirement in 2005.

He was born in Buxton...

Gordon Wolstenholme was a distinguished physician and medical administrator, a man of great personal charm whose outward gentleness concealed a...

Guidelines

NICE accredited clinical practice guidelines 

Available here

22nd Annual Report

Analyses about care provided to patients at UK renal centres.

Read the report

UKRR AKI Report

A report on the nationwide collection of AKI warning test scores. 

Read the report